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Featured Articles

November 20, 2018

A Case of a Patient with Severe Epidermolysis Bullosa Surviving to Adulthood

Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of rare inherited connective tissue diseases that result in blister formation on the skin. The incidence rate is 20 per million births in the United States. It occurs in all ethnic groups. The lesions, which can initially appear after birth or anytime until early adulthood, often present as dense blisters that may eventually rupture and lead to scars. Blisters usually occur at the sites of trauma or pressure, which are primarily the hands, feet, and diaper area in children, but may also present in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, or genitalia. Generally, EB is a chronic condition that is disfiguring and painful. Patients with EB may have co-occurring conditions such as fused digits and clubbed hands or feet. Read More

Stem-Cell-Laden Skin Grafts Could Heal Burn Victims 30% Faster, if Not Quicker

Researchers at the University of Toronto (UoT) are working to give burn victims their skin back. The team has developed a new process by which stem cells are retrieved from the burned skin and used to speed up recovery. Such a treatment option would greatly improve the chances of survival for those involved in fires or industrial accidents, as well as their quality of life to boot. The team plans to start human trials by early 2019. Read More

Classifying Diabetic Foot Ulcers

While dermatologists are unlikely to treat patients with severe foot infections that require hospitalization, they must be able to diagnose and manage mild-to-moderate infections in diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), and follow current Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines regarding antibiotic use, according to Warren S. Joseph, D.P.M., FIDSA, who presented at DERMfoot 2018. He is a consultant, lower extremity infectious diseases, Roxborough Memorial Hospital, Philadelphia, and a co-author of the IDSA guidelines, which appeared in Clinical Infectious Diseases in June 2012.   Read More

The Power of Continuous Monitoring to Transform Post-Acute Care

As an administrator in a skilled nursing facility, I see firsthand and recognize the hard work that clinicians and professional staff that work in this type of environment must endure. Often, I bare witness to these unsung heroes of healthcare, working long hours with strenuous workloads, while trying to provide the best possible care for the patients and residents in their facilities. As we all recognize, in today’s environment, many of our clinicians and caregivers are being asked to do even more, facing additional challenges by caring for more medically complex patients who historically have been cared for in hospitals. Many of these patients have multiple chronic conditions and require more comprehensive care. Read More